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Adamson, Gordon

Gordon Sinclair Adamson was born in Orangeville, Ontario, May 19, 1904. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1928. After working for Sproatt & Roll, Mathers & Haldenby, Edwin Kay Ltd., and Shell Oil Co., he became principal in the firm of Adamson & Morgan in 1934. In 1946 the firm became Gordon Adamson & Associates. He was the president of the Ontario Association of Architects in 1953.

Significant projects include: Apartment house at 130 Forest Hill Road, Toronto; Holt Renfrew Building, Toronto; Bell Telephone Co.of Canada, Exchange Building, Pickering; Canada and Dominion Sugar Company, Toronto; Co-operators Insurance Association Office Building, London; Kipling Collegiate Institute, Etobicoke; Peacock Contracting Company Office Building, Toronto; St. Clair Balfour Residence, Toronto.

 

Affleck, Raymond

Raymond Tait Affleck was born in Penticton, British Columbia, November 20, 1922. He received his Bachelor of.Architecture from McGill University in 1947 then did graduate work at the Eidgenossische Technische Hochscule (Zurich) in 1948. After working for McDougall Smith and Fleming (1948-50) and Vincent Rother, Montreal (1950-51), he became principal in the firm R.T. Affleck in 1952. In 1955 the firm became Affleck Desbarats Dimakopolous Lebensold Sise, where he remained until his death (March 15, 1989). He was a Fellow in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1965) and an Academician in the Royal Academy of Arts (1967).

Awards: Massey Medal - 1961, 1964, 1967, 1970 ; Canadian Centennial Medal - 1967 ; RAIC Gold Medal (posthumously) -1989.

Significant projects include: Klassen House, St. Hilaire; Talbot Johnson House, Senneville; Harry Hoy House, Lac Tremblant; National Gallery Competition (1976-1977). Affleck is particularly associated with the Montréal developments Place Bonaventure (1964-68),Place Ville Marie (1956-65), and the Maison Alcan (1983, awarded the Prix d'excellence in 1984).

 

Andrews, John

John Andrews was born in Syndey, New South Wales, Australia, October 29, 1933. He received his Bachelor of .Architecture from the University of Sydney (1956) and his Masters of.Architecture from Harvard University (1958). Prior to establishing his own firm, he worked for Edwards Madigan Torzillo (Sydney, 1957) and John B. Parkin (Toronto, 1958-1962). In 1962 he became principal in the firm John Andrews Architects (Toronto). Since 1972 he has been principal in the firm John Andrews International Pty Ltd (Sydney). He is an Associate in the Royal Institute of British Architects, a Fellow in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, a Life Fellow in the Royal Australian Institute of Architects, and an Honorary Fellow in the American Institute of Architects. In 1981 he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia.

Awards: Centennial Medal, Canada - 1967; Massey Medal, Canada - 1967; Arnold Brunner Award, National Institute of Arts and Letters, New York - 1971; Bronze Medal, Queensland Institute of Architects - 1976; Gold Medal, Royal Australian Institute of Architects - 1980; Sulman Medal, Royal Australian Institute of Architects - 1983; 25 Year Award, Ontario Association of Architects - 1989.

Significant projects include: Scarborough College, Scarborough; Bellmere Public School, Scarborough; African Place, Expo 67, Montreal; Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville; Gund Hall, Cambridge.

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Beatson-Finlayson

The firm of Beatson Finlayson and Partners was established in 1957 by Gilbert Beatson under the name Gilbert R. Beatson Architect (Calgary). In 1971, after various partnership changes, it became known as Beatson Finlayson and Partners (Calgary).

Beatson, Gilbert
The principal of the firm was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1927. He received his B.Arch. from the University of Manitoba in1950, then proceeded to do graduate work at the Sorbonne (Paris) in 1952. After working for Lloyd Finch Architects (Winnipeg, 1952-55) he became Chief Architect, Western Region for the Canadian Pacific Railway (1955-56).

Finlayson, Arthur J.

Arthur J. Finlayson was born in Regina,Saskatchewan in 1938. He received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Manitoba (1963) and his Bachelor of Archetecture from the University of Montana (1964).Prior to joining the firm in 1969, he worked for J.H. Cook and Associates (1964-67) and Rule Wynn Hames and Partners (1967-69).

Significant projects include: McPherson Park Swimming Pool, Burnaby, BC; Jasper Place Sport Centre; Red Deer Recreation Park, Red Deer, AB; Inuvik Corporation Housing, N.W.T.; Western Canada Pavilion, Expo '67; Selkirk Civic Centre, MAN.

 

Benjamin, S.N.

Biography Currently Available

 

Brown, Francis Bruce

Francis Bruce Brown was born in Toronto in 1899. He received his Bachelor of.Architecture (Honours) from the University of Toronto in 1923 and was the recipient of the Architectural Guild medal. That same year he was awarded the Ontario Government French Travelling Scholarship and studied at the Fontainbleau School of Fine Arts in France during 1923-24. He received his Masters of.Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1925. He joined his father's firm in 1926. In the late 1940s he and E.F. Ross Brisley partnered in the firm Bruce Brown & Brisley (1946-1952). The firm later changed to Brown Brisely & Brown (1952-1972).

Significant projects include: Monroe County Court House, Rochester, New York; Competition Drawings, Legislative Buildings, Victoria, BC.

 

Brown, John Francis

John Francis Brown was born in Levis,Quebec in 1866, but attended school in Plymouth, England. He returned to Canada in 1882 and trained for architecture in various Toronto offices, including Edwards & Webster. He opened J. Francis Brown Architecture in 1891; a derivative of this firm is still established as BB&R Architect Inc.

In 1888, he was resident architect on the Board of Trade Building for the firm James & James of New York. He was one of five architects chosen for the second stage of the competition for the British Columbia Parliament Buildings (Victoria, 1891). He was a member of the Architectural Draughtsmen's Club (1886-1892), a member of the Eighteen Club (1899-1902), and a member of the Ontario Association of Architects (1892).

Significant Projects include: McMaster University (Hamilton, ON), Gravenhurst Opera House (1901).

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Cardinal, Douglas

Douglas Joseph Cardinal was born in Calgary, Alberta, March 7, 1934. The son of a game warden, he studied architecture at University of British Columbia and the University of Texas, Austin, from which he graduated with honours in 1963. He worked at the firm of Bissell & Holman in Red Deer, (1963- 67), and as principal in the firm Douglas J. Cardinal Architect (1964-). He practiced in Edmonton for eighteen years, and moved his practice to Ottawa in 1985. He is a Fellow in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1983) and a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (1974).

Significant Projects include: Canadian Museum of Civilization, in Hull, Quebec, St. Mary's Church (Red Deer, AB), the Grande Prairie Regional College, the Edmonton

Space and Sciences Centre, the Government Services Centre in Ponoka, St. Albert Place (St.Albert, AB) :Alberta Pavilion, Expo '86; Leighton Artist Colony, Banff, AB; Sacred Heart Church, Terrace, BC.

Awards: Honor Award (Alberta Association of Architects) - 1968 ; Honour Award (City of Red Deer, AB) - 1969 ; Award of Excellence (City of Red Deer, AB) - 1978 ; Award of Excellence (Canadian Architect) - 1972 ; Achievement of Excellence Award in Architecture (Province of Alberta) - 1974, Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts - 2001.

 

Clayton, Bond, and Mogridge

Clayton, John Cyril

John Cyril Clayton was born in Cheshire, England in 1918. He qualified as an architect in 1948 after service in the Royal Engineers during the Second World War. He immigrated to Calgary in 1952 and worked with Rule, Wynn, and Rule. In 1953 he joined with Calgary architect Kenneth Bond to form the partnership Clayton and Bond, later to be joined by Allan Mogridge to form Clayton, Bond and Mogridge. They designed many buildings in Calgary and vicinity including the new terminal building for Calgary Airport in 1956.

John Clayton was Vice-President of the Alberta Association of Architects for several years. He served on the board of the CNIB, was a Lay Reader and Member of Synod representing St. Andrew's Church and enjoyed his membership of the Officers' Mess in Currie Barracks. Family ties made him return to England in 1971, where he became Deputy City Architect to the historic city of Durham in the north of England until his retirement in 1983.

Mogridge, Allan W

Allan W. Mogridge was born in Calgary, Alberta. After serving the in Air Force in WWII, he articled with E.T. Brown (1946-?). When Mr. Brown died, Allan Mogridge and Alfred Hodges bought the practice. Later, Maxwell Bates joined the firm which then became know as Hodges & Bates. Allan Mogridge later left to work for the firm of John C. Clayton.

Bond, Ken
Ken Bond was born in Calgary, Alberta. After serving in WWII he attended the University of Manitoba then practiced with Peter Rule of Rule, Wynn & Rule (Calgary). In 1953 he joined in partnership with John C. Clayton which then changed names to Clayton, Bond Architects.

Significant projects include: Bethany Extended Care Centre, Calgary; Prairie Bible Institute, Three Hills; Calgary Air Terminal -McCall Field, Calgary; Cave & Basin (1950s), Banff; Jasper Park Pool, Jasper; Olympic Pool & Facilities, University of Calgary, Calgary.

 

Cohos Evamy and Partners

The firm of Cohos Evamy & Partners was established in 1959 by Martin Cohos and Michael Evamy. Cohos Evamy was originally founded as an architecture and engineering studio in Calgary and quickly evolved into an interdisciplinary model under the leadership of Martin Cohos, Michael Evamy, and Paul Poffenroth. In 1980 Cohos Evamy expanded to Edmonton and later in 2003 they opened a Toronto studio.

Significant Projects include: Sunshine Village Lodge, Banff; Happy Valley Ski Lodge, Calgary; St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church, Brentwood; Ramada Inn, Calgary, TransCanada Tower, Calgary, Bankers Hall, Calgary, Calgary International Airport.

 

Corneil, Carmen & Elin

Carmen Corneil

Carmen Corneil was born in Niagara Falls, New York, December 19, 1933. He received his Bachelor of Architecture (Honours) from the University of Toronto in 1957. From 1967 to 1996 he was a professor in the Programme in Architecture at the University of Toronto. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architecture, a member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, and a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts (1975).

Elin Corneil

Elin Corneil was born in Trondheim Norway on July 23, 1935.She graduated with a diploma from the department of architecture at the Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim in 1962. Elin taught in Norway at the Norwegian Institute of Technology, and in the Faculty of Architecture at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She has also lectured at the University of Toronto, and the MIT School of Architecture in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most recently Elin held the Visiting Critic Master's Studio at the School of Architecture, University College Dulbin. Elin has been a member of the Council of the Trondheim Architectural Association, the Committee of the Museum Norwegian Fish Industry Museum, a founding member on the committee for documentation of the Norwegian Iron and Steel Industry, and Chairman for the ‘Amelia Earhart' Stipend committee.

Significant projects include: School of Architecture building, Carleton University, Ottawa; Wayland Drew House, Port Perry, ON; Canadian Pavilion, Expo '70; Harbourfront, Toronto; OPSEU Headquarters, Don Mills, ON; Vestmannaeyjar Municipal Works, Vestmannaejar, Iceland

Awards: Medal, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada,1957; Massey Medal, 1971; Governor General's Medal (Ontario),1992.

 

Crowther, Reid

Reid Crowther & Partners Limited was established in 1965, but the genealogy of the company goes back to its origins as John Galt, Consulting Engineers, Toronto, 1885. Various partnership name changes as well as changes in location led ultimately to the current incarnation of the firm in Calgary, AB in 1965.

Significant projects include: Brooks Aqueduct (1912); water and sewer systems in Big Valley, Gleichen, and Bassano, AB; Bridge Dam, Kindersley, SK.

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Dale Chandler Kennedy

Albert Dale

Albert Dale was born in England in 1927. He graduated from Manchester and Nottingham University School of Architecture & Town Planning, where he received his Diploma in Architecture (1949) and qualified as a Town Planning Consultant (1953). After emigrating to Canada, he registered with the Alberta Association of Architects 1954) and opened his own architectural and Town Planning office (Calgary). In 1974 the firm of A. Dale & Associates merged with that of Chandler/Kennedy Architects and became known as the DCK Partnership.

Sheldon H. Chandler

Sheldon H. Chandler received his Bachelor of Architecture at McGill University (1963). His worked in Montreal and Denmark prior to being admitted as a member of the Alberta Association of Architects and opened his own practice in Calgary in 1968.

Gordon Gerald Kennedy

Gordon Gerald Kennedy received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of British Columbia (1964) and trained with J.H. Cook & Associates, W.G. Milne, and Beatson Stevens & Associates (all of Calgary). In June 1965 he was admitted to the Alberta Association of Architects and joined Sheldon Chandler in the partnership of Chandler/Kennedy Architects in 1970.

In the year of the merger with A. Dale & Associates, the new firm opened a second office in Edmonton. Three years later, Albert D Bale retired and the firm changed its name to the Chandler/Kennedy Architectural Group in order to emphasize the team nature of contemporary practice. In 1978 the partnership expanded still further by opening an office in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and an agency in Vancouver. An increasing number of commissions abroad necessitated the creation of a subsidiary, the Chandler/Kennedy Architectural Group-International, and two further offices were opened: London, England, and one in Denver, Colorado. From the beginning, the firm extended its activities beyond individual building projects to various planning studies for small towns, colleges, commercial and office complexes to major developments of high and low density land uses.

Significant projects include: Palliser Square, Calgary; Olds Agricultural and Vocational College, Olds; McLaurin Village, Calgary; Hull Estates, Calgary; Chevron Plaza, Calgary; Eau Claire Complex, Calgary; Lindsay Park Aquatic Centre, Calgary; Husky Tower, Calgary.

 

A.J. Diamond/Donald Shmitt

Biography Currently Unavailable

 

Du Toit, Roger

Roger du Toit was born in 1939. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Cape Town (1963) and his Masters of Architecture from the University of Toronto (1966). After working for H.G. Huckle & Partners (London, England, 1963-?) he joined John Andrews Architects (Toronto) in 1966, becoming an associate in 1969 and a partner in 1970. In 1973 he established John Andrews International/Roger du Toit (Toronto). In 1975 he changed the firm's name to Roger du Toit Architects (Toronto). During the same year he incorporated du Toit Associates Ltd. to provide planning and urban design services. In 1980 he established a practice in Edmonton. He helped establish The Cunningham Parternship (Edmonton) which operated from 1981-1987. In 1985, the firm du Toit Associates Ltd. changed to du Toit, Allsop, Hillier, a provider of urban design, landscape, architectural and planning services. du Toit is a member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1969), the Ontario Association of Architects (1969), the Canadian Institute of Planners (1973), the American Institute of Certified Planners (1983), and the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects (1985).

Awards: Canadian Architect Yearbook Awards, 1970, 1976, 1978; Excellence in Architectural and Engineering Design, Prestressed Concrete Institute of America, 1976; Significant Contribution to the Environment of Alberta, Alberta Association of Architects, 1983; Progressive Architecture Annual Design Awards, 1987; Award of Excellence, Canadian Architect Annual Design Awards, 1987.

Significant Projects include: Sha Lo Tung Recreation Neighbourhood, Hong Kong; Northeast Light Rail Transit Corridor Study, Edmonton; Leisure Cottages, Havelock, ON; C.M. H.C. Mixed Use Centres; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

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Erickson, Arthur

Arthur Erickson was born in Vancouver, British Columbia on June 14, 1924. He attended the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, 1942-45) and McGill University (Montreal, 1946-50) where he received his Bachelor of Architecture (Honours). He was awarded the McLennan Travelling Scholarship for architectural research in the Middle East and Europe (1950-53). He had his own practice from 1953-62 (Vancouver), then formed Erickson/Massey Architects with partner Geoffrey Massey (Vancouver, 1963-72). In 1972, he became principal in the firm Arthur Erickson Architects (Vancouver, Los Angeles and Toronto), and since 1977 he has been President of Arthur Erickson Associates (Vancouver, Toronto, Kuwait, and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia). He is a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1953), an Academician of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (1953), an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (1978), and a Companion in the Order of Canada (1981).

Awards: Massey Medal, 1955, 1958, 1967 (3 times) and 1970 (3 times); Canada Council Fellowship, 1961; First Prize, Simon Fraser University Competition, Burnaby, British Columbia, 1963; Tokyo International Trade Fair Award, 1965; Centennial Design Award, National Housing Design Council, 1967; Residential Design Award, Canadian Housing Design Council, 1975; Auguste Perret Award, International Union of Architects, 1974; Honour Award (4 times), Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, 1980; Gold Medal, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, 1984; Chicago Architecture Award, 1984; Gold Medal, French Academy of Architecture, 1984.

Significant projects include: Grauer Garden Terrace & Cabana, Vancouver; Simon Fraser University Master Plan, Burnaby, BC; Canadian Pavilion, Expo '67; MacMillan Bloedel Building, Vancouver; Canadian Pavilion, Expo '70; Project I, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB; Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

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Hemingway, Peter

Peter Hemingway was born in Minster, England in 1929. Peter Hemingway earned a diploma from Rochester Technical College in Kent and immigrated to Canada in 1955. He worked briefly at the Alberta Department of Public Works and in 1956 established an architectural practice in Edmonton. Responsible for a small yet critically praised corpus of buildings, all in or near Edmonton, Hemingway contributed frequently to professional publications and in 1982 served the Alberta Association of Architects as its president

Awards: 2 Massey medals.

Significant projects include: Muttart Conservatory (Edmonton); Central Pentecostal Tabernacle (Edmonton); Coronation Swimming Pool (Edmonton); Yellowknife Court House, Stanley Engineering Building (Edmonton)

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Long, Jack

Jack Long was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania in 1925. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he attended Penn State University to study architecture. Long opened an architectural practice in Calgary, AB. In 1963, he became Special Planning Consultant to the City of Calgary. From 1964 to 1970, he was a partner in the firm McMillan Long & Associates, after which time he returned to independent practice. In 1967, Long received a C.M.H.C. fellowship to attend McGill University to study Urban Planning, graduating with a Master's in Planning (1970). Long prepared the original master plan for Calgary's plus-15 system and served as a Calgary Alderman (1980-1983).

Significant projects include: Calgary Centennial Planetarium, Calgary, AB; Administration Building, Calgary Separate School Board, Calgary, AB; Kelvin Grove Patio Apartments, Calgary, AB.

 

Lombard North

The landscape architecture firm of Lombard North Group was established in 1965 (Winnipeg) as Cameron Man. Soon after, the name was changed to Man, Taylor, Muret. In 1973, at the same time an office was established in Calgary, the name of the firm was changed to the Lombard North Group.

Significant projects include: Prince's Island, Calgary, AB; Court House Park, Calgary, AB; Cataracts Territorial Park, Yellowknife, NWT; Lord Selkirk Park, Winnipeg, MN; University of Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK.

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McCarter Nairne & Partners

McCarter Nairne & Partners was a Vancouver-based architectural firm founded in 1921 by John Young McCarter (1886-1981) and George Colvil Nairne (1884-1953).

The partnership began in 1921 and primarily designed houses and small apartment buildings. Within a few years they moved on to design two of Vancouver's first skyscrapers (the Marine Building and the Georgia Medical Dental Building). During World War II, the firm assumed the responsibility for federal wartime housing and urban development in British Columbia. After the war was over, the firm designed a wide variety of buildings, including factories, banks, and schools. The last project involving both partners was the General Post Office (Vancouver), a one-square city block structure.

Significant projects include: the Marine Building, Vancouver, BC; Georgia Medical Dental Building, Vancouver, BC; Canadian Services College Royal Roads, Vancouver Island, BC; University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC; Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, BC; General Post Office, Vancouver, BC.

 

McMillan, H.W.R.

Hugh McMillan worked with Rule Wynn & Rule (Edmonton) as a student, then as an Associate Member of the firm J.A. Cawston and Associates (Calgary) until 1960, when he entered practice with Allan H. Waisman and J.M. Ross under the name of H.W.R. McMillan and Associates (Calgary). In 1964, Jack Long joined the firm and the partnership name was changed to McMillan Long and Associates. After Long retired in 1969, the name of the firm was changed to Hugh McMillan Architects.

Significant projects include: Calgary Centennial Planetarium, Calgary, AB; Calgary Herald Building, Calgary, AB; Rutland Mews Townhousing, Calgary, AB; Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT), Calgary, AB.

 

McMordie, Michael

Michael McMordie is a graduate of the Universities of Toronto (BArch 1962) and Edinburgh (PhD 1972).  From 1965 until 1974 a member of the Edinburgh faculty, he joined the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary in 1974. In his doctoral research he undertook an historical and critical study of important sources of modern architectural theory.  He has taught architectural history and theory at both Edinburgh and Calgary, acted as a studio instructor and supervised the work of graduate students in a number of areas.  Administrative roles have included Director of the architecture program 1979-82, Dean of the Faculty of General Studies (now Communication & Culture) 1990-98 and from 1999 to 2005 Director of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Faculty of Graduate Studies (until 2004 the Resources and the Environment Program).  He played a key role in the founding and early development of the Canadian Architectural Archives. In addition to service on many university committees and boards an important interest has been architectural and urban conservation.  Local and national activities beyond the university have included the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada (President 1977-80), and the Calgary Civic Trust (President 1999-2003, Trustee 2003-). He retired from the university in December 2005 and was subsequently named Professor Emeritus of Environmental Design. In November 2006 he was admitted to The Order of the University of Calgary. Research interests and writing include architectural history and theory, aesthetics, urbanism, and culture and national identity.

Awards:  Heritage Canada Foundation Gabrielle Léger medal in 2002 and the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee medal in 2003.

 

Markson, Jerome

Jerome Markson was born in Toronto, Ontario, March 21, 1929. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1953. He has been the principal in Jerome Markson Architects (Toronto) since 1955. He has served as Vice-Chairman, Toronto Chapter of the Ontario Association of Architects (1969-70), as well as a Member of the Board (1976) and Vice-President (1978) of the Toronto Chapter of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario. He is also a Fellow in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, an Associate in the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts, a Member of the Ontario Association of Architects and the Ordre des Architectes du Quebec.

Awards: Canadian Housing Design Council Award, 1960, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1977, 1980 and 1983; Massey Medal, 1964; Ontario Association of Architects Award, 1964, 1970, 1977; Canadian Architect Award, 1968, 1970; Markham Environmental Award, Ontario, 1980.

Significant projects include: Pembroke Sherbourne Housing Development, Toronto; Woodview Housing Development, Woodbridge, ON; Group Health Centres, Sault Ste. Marie and St. Catharines, ON; Sherwood Park Manor Nursing Home, Brockville, ON; Erin Mills Development.

 

Mathers & Haldenby

The firm of Mathers and Haldenby was established in 1921 by Alvan Sherlock Mathers and Eric Wilson Haldenby. Mather and Haldenby became partners in 1961.

In 1964, the transfer of partnership to their respective sons, Andrew Sherlock Mathers and Douglas Charles Haldenby, occurred.

Andrew Sherlock Mathers

Andrew Sherlock Mathers was born in Toronto, Ontario, September 16, 1934. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1959. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada

Douglas Charles Haldenby

Douglas Charles Haldenby was born in Toronto, Ontario, March 3, 1925. He received his B.Arch. from the University of Toronto and married Muriel Ross in 1948. He began his professional practice with Mathers and Haldenby, and served as supervising architect on projects ranging from Toronto to Cuba, Vancouver, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Montreal, and Quebec City. He served with the Canadian Army from 1943 to 1945. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and a Fellow in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Significant projects include: Eaton Centre,Toronto; National Archives and Library, Ottawa;Queen's Park, Phase II, Toronto; Bell Telephone Co., London, ON.

 

Mawson, Thomas Hayton

Thomas Mawson was born in 1861 in England and began his career as a garden designer. He later became known for his successful urban design and town planning practice with offices in Lancaster and London, England, as well as Vancouver, BC and New York. One of his most ambitious projects was a plan for the City of Calgary (1913). Mawson also developed Master Plans for Regina, the University of Saskatchewan, and Stanley Park, Vancouver. Mawson died in 1933.The original City of Calgary presentation drawings were recovered when a garage in the Eau Claire district of Calgary was demolished and the sheeting that had been used to finish the interior was stripped from the studs. The drawings had been glued to the reverse side of the board.

 


Moriyama, Raymond

Raymond Moriyama was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, October 11,1929. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1954, and his Masters of Architecture from McGill University in 1957. Moriyama has been in private practice since 1958, partnering with Ted Teshima in 1969. He is a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1970), a Member of the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts (1973), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, London (1970).

Awards: Massey Medal for Architecture, 1961; Canadian Architects Yearbook Award, 1968; Pre-stressed Concrete Institute Award, 1969; Citizen's Award, 1974; Massey Medal for Planning, 1976; Japan Foundation Award, 1977;Canadian Architect Award of Excellence, 1979;OMRC Award of Excellence, 1979, 1981; Stelco Design Award, 1980; Urban Design Award, 1982; Governor General's Medal for Architecture, 1982.

Significant projects include: Japanese-Canadian Cultural Centre, North York, ON; Scarborough Town Centre, Scarborough, ON; Ontario Science Centre, North York, ON,

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON; Thunder Bay Charitable Casino, Thunder Bay, ON..

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Parkin, John. B.

Canadian architect. John B. Parkin was born in Toronto, Ontario, June 26, 1911. He received his Diploma in Architecture from the University of Toronto in 1935. From 1935-1937, Parkin worked in the office of architects Howard and Souster (London), then went into private practice in Toronto (1937-1947). HeParkin entered parternship with his brother, Edmund T. Parkin, a landscape architect, and with John C. Parkin (no relation) in the firm John B. Parkin Associates (1947-1968). In 1968, the firm changed its name to Parkin Architects Engineers and Planners. In 1970, John C. Parkin left to establish Parkin Architects Planners. Parkin was an Associate Professor at the University of Southern California and California Institute of Technology, a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Awards include: First Prize, Ontario Association of Architects Headquarters Competition, 1953; 14 Massey Foundation Medals, from 1954.

Significant projects include: Ontario Association of Architects Headquarters, Toronto; Salvation Army National Headquarters and Temple, Toronto; Oshawa Central Collegiate Institute, Oshawa, ON; Faberge Factory, Etobicoke, ON; Garage and Stores Building, York Hydro System; Humber Memorial Hospital.

 

Patkau, John & Patricia

John Patkau received his Masters of Architecture from the University of Manitoba in 1972.During the summer of 1971, he worked for Erickson/Massey Architects, Vancouver, then upon graduation Patkau went into private practice with Denis Jesson (1972-1973). After returning from Europe in 1974, he was employed with the Zeidler Partnership Architects (Toronto), moving in 1975 to Bittorf-Holland-Christianson Architects Ltd. (Edmonton) in 1975. In 1977 Patkau began his own private practice in Edmonton. He is a Member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Award: the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada medal.

Significant projects include: Galleria Condominium Project; Riverdale Community Centre; Blue Quill Elementary School, Edmonton; Stadium Rapid Transit Station, Edmonton; Pyrch Residence.

 

Pirie, Alexander

Biography Currently Unavailable

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Raines, Edwin

Edwin Raines was born in Ystrad Mynach, Wales, December 12, 1923. He received his Bachelor of Architecture. from the University of Manitoba in 1947. He remained as a lecturer in architecture at the University of Manitoba until 1952. In 1952 Raines began working as Research Architect at the Research Group at Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation (Ottawa, 1952-1954). In 1954 he became Chief Architect of Rupertsland Trading Company in Winnipeg, overseeing the design and construction of Hudson Bay Co.stores across Canada. Raines joined J. Stevenson and Associates in 1957.

Significant Projects include: Epcor Centre for Performing Arts (Calgary)

 

Rule Wynn & Rule (Calgary)

The firm of Rule Wynn and Rule Architects was established in 1938 (Edmonton) by John Ulric Rule (1904-1978) and Gordon K. Wynn (1910-1994). They were joined the following year by John Rule's brother, Peter Leitch Rule (1913-1964). All three principals were graduates of the University of Alberta's architecture program. Although a series of name changes have reflected changes in key personnel, the existing Edmonton office is one of the longest continuously operating architectural firms in Alberta.

During World War II the firm was left in the hands of the Rules'father, Peter Rule, Sr., a building inspector for Alberta Government Telephones. Although not trained as an architect, Rule, Sr.designed many of the provinces telephone exchange buildings. To recognize his contribution to Alberta's architectural landscape, he was granted a special certificate by the Alberta Association of Architects in January 1941. In 1945 the firm expanded to Calgary, with Peter Rule as partner in charge. The Calgary office was closed in 1986.

Awards: City of Edmonton Architectural Award - 1978; Alberta Association of Architects Award - 1978, 1979, 1983, 1985.

Significant projects (Calgary office) include: Petroleum Building, Spruce Cliff Apartments, Trend House, Elveden Centre, MacMahon Stadium (all located in Calgary).

 

Rule Wynn & Rule (Edmonton)

The firm of Rule Wynn and Rule Architects was established in Edmonton in 1938 by John Ulric Rule (1904-1978) and Gordon K. Wynn (1910- 1994). They were joined the following year by John Rule's brother, Peter Leitch Rule (1913-1964). All three principals were graduates of the University of Alberta's architecture program. Although a series of name changes have have reflected changes in key personnel, the existing Edmonton office is one of the longest continuously operating architectural firms in Alberta.

Awards: City of Edmonton Architectural Award - 1978; Alberta Association of Architects Award - 1978, 1979, 1983, 1985.

Significant projects (Edmonton office) include: Foster McGarvey Funeral Home; Varscona Theatre; Alberta Government Telephone Building; Commonwealth Aquatic Centre (all located in Edmonton).

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Stanley, K.C

K.C Stanley primarily practiced in Edmonton and region. His firm underwent a series of name changes (Stanley & Stanley, Dewar Stevenson & Stanley, K.C. Stanley & Company, and Ross M. Stanley) during the period 1948-1979. Stanley was a key contributor to the modern movement in Edmonton. His works include private residences, churches, schools, theatres, office buildings, stores, University and Government buildings, etc.

Significant projects include: Edmonton City Hall; the Y.M.C.A. building; St. Paul's United Church; Alberta Teachers Association Headquarters Building; Baltz Office Building (all located in Edmonton).

 

Stanley, T.E.A

Three houses designed by T.E.A. Stanley, father of K.C. Stanley, are included in the CAA collections. Little is known of him as an architect. He was the Principal of The High School (Calgary), South Calgary High School, and Western Canada High School between 1909-1931.

 

Stevenson, Raines Barrett Christie Hutton Seton & Partners

The firm of Stevenson Raines is Calgary's oldest architectural firm, dating back to the beginning of the 20th century when it was known as Lawson & O'Gara..


Significant projects include: various Calgary Exhibition and Stampede buildings; Calgary International Airport ; Mount Royal College; Braemar Lodge; Knox United Church; Bailey Residence; Sacred Heart Church Addition; MacEwan Hall (University of Calgary); Calgary Public School Board Education Centre; Lacombe Vocational High School.

 

Strong, Richard

Richard Strong received his Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree from Ohio State University (1957) and a Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design (1959). In 1961, he formed the partnership of Sasaki Strong & Associates Ltd. with Hideo Sasaki, a leading landscape architect and Professor of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University. Strong later founded the firm Richard Strong Associates Ltd. (Toronto) in 1967, and in 1970 he became president of Strong Moorhead Sigsby Ltd. (Toronto, Sidney, Australia). The firm's name changed in 1973 to Richard Strong - Steven Moorhead. Strong moved his practice to Calgary, Alberta in 1977, establishing it there as Richard Strong Associates.


Strong has held a variety of academic positions throughout his career. He was a part-time lecturer at the University of Toronto (1965-1966) as well as an assistant professor (1966-1968). In 1967 he became Professor and Chairman of the Department of Landscape Architecture in the Faculty of Architecture at the University of Toronto. After moving to Calgary, he began teaching part-time at the Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary.

Significant projects include: Toronto City Hall, Toronto, ON (Parkin Collection); Toronto International Airport, Toronto, ON (Parkin Collection); Trent University, Peterborough, ON (Thom Collection); York University, Toronto, ON (Parkin Collection); Master University, Hamilton, ON; Eau Claire Estates, Calgary, AB.

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Thom, Ron

Ronald James Thom was born on May 15, 1923 at Penticton, BC. He trained as a painter at the Vancouver School of Art, graduating in 1947. In 1963, as the Toronto partner of Thompson, Berwick, Pratt & Partners, Thom established an office under the name Ron Thom Architect. This partnership lasted until 1969, when Thom founded the firm R.J. Thom Architects. In 1974 the name was changed to The Thom Partnership, and included architects, planners, interior design consultants and graphic designers. Thom was a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, Member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (1973), Member of the Ontario Association of Architects, Member of the Architectural Institute of British Columbia, and Member of the Province of Quebec Association of Architects (1966-1969). He was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Law (LL.D) by Trent University in 1971, and an honorary Doctorate of Engineering in 1973.

Awards: Winner of Design Competition for Massey College, University of Toronto; Citations of Excellence in Architecture (4) - International College and University Conference and Exposition, 1970; Toronto Chapter Annual Design Award - 1970; National Design Council Merit awards (2) - 1971; Canadian Housing Design Council Award - 1971; Canadian Architect Yearbook Award of Excellence - 1974.

Significant projects include: Trent University (Peterborough, ON); Massey College, University of Toronto (Toronto, ON); Peterborough and Lindsay Campuses of the Sir Sandford Fleming College of Applied Arts and Technology; Faculty of Arts & Social Science Complex, Queen's University (Kingston, ON); Shaw Festival Theatre (Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON); Prince Hotel (Toronto, ON); Lester B. Pearson College (Vancouver Island, BC); Metropolitan Toronto Zoo (Toronto, ON).

 

Thompson Berwick Pratt & Partners

The firm was founded in 1908 by British architects G.L.T. Sharp and Charles J. Thompson as Sharp & Thompson. When the University of British Columbia was created by the Provincial Legislature as the province's first Canadian Architectural Archives -- Thompson, Berwick, Pratt & Partners fonds public institution for higher education in 1908, Sharp & Thompson won an international competition for the Point Grey campus.

Significant projects include: Chateau Frontenac (1908); MacAuley Nicholls Office Building (Vancouver, 1927); Library, University of British Columbia (1923); Quadra Club, now University Club (1923).

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Widdington, H.M

Biography Currently Unavailable

 

Williams, Donovan & Eunice Joan

Biography Currently Unavailable

 

Williams, W.F

Biography Currently Unavailable

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